30 September 2006

    It's a stunning morning here in the valley.  Early on we had a mist down on the river that gradually thinned as it climbed the hills and gave a soft almost iridescent light as the sun broke through.  Add a heavy dew and crisp feel to the air and you have an almost perfect autumn morning.  All it needed was the smell of wood smoke and cooking bacon. Wonderful.

We had a classic illustration yesterday afternoon of the principle that in game fishing the only true theory about catching fish is that there is no true theory.  Alan Maden dropped by to catch up with things, tell me about his trip to Lewis and try the river for a sea trout.  A great time was had by all on Lewis with a good bag of salmon and sea trout, much good company and a dolphin experience of a lifetime.  About an hour after he left me Alan was back to tell of the 6 and a half pound cock salmon he had just landed by the rock pool.  Now, the river is low with very little flow and one would have thought that the chance of a salmon on that water would be nil.  Yet, there it was, in good condition and ready to take a fly intended for a sea trout. It just goes to show – you never know!

It's the last day of the trout season today but if we get some rain soon then the river will still be worth a try for  salmon until the 31st and of course the Tarn has only been stocked with rainbows this year so remains open until October 31st.

Ian

29 September 2006

    It's a cracking morning here in the valley.  Just a high, light covering of cloud with plenty of diffuse sun and a very light breeze.  The river is still a bit on the low side but conditions are not bad for the final trouting days of the season.

The first fallen leaves are now on the pastures round the house and it really feels like autumn has begun especially as the sloe gin got made yesterday and put down for Christmas.

I can't remember seeing for many years such a crop of berries and fruit on the trees as we have now.  A walk up the river is brightened on even the dullest day by the burning bushes that are the rowans and may trees.  They seem almost overburdened with berries and hawes.  The same is true of my damson tree, enough this year for several bottles of wine.

I'm not sure what the reason is for this super abundance.  Maybe it was the hot, dry summer following the very wet spring and wet back end.  Whatever the reason the dales really do look a picture now and any one contemplating a salmon fishing trip next week should bring a camera.  When the salmon aren't there there will always be plenty to photograph.

I was sorely tempted this week by a property advert for a croft in the far north west of Skye.  6 acres, a trout stream, two building plots, 35 goats, grazing rights on 1000 acres of the Glendale estate, a three bedroomed Victorian house and views to kill for, all for

29 September 2006

    It's a cracking morning here in the valley.  Just a high, light covering of cloud with plenty of diffuse sun and a very light breeze.  The river is still a bit on the low side but conditions are not bad for the final trouting days of the season.

The first fallen leaves are now on the pastures round the house and it really feels like autumn has begun especially as the sloe gin got made yesterday and put down for Christmas.

I can't remember seeing for many years such a crop of berries and fruit on the trees as we have now.  A walk up the river is brightened on even the dullest day by the burning bushes that are the rowans and may trees.  They seem almost overburdened with berries and hawes.  The same is true of my damson tree, enough this year for several bottles of wine.

I'm not sure what the reason is for this super abundance.  Maybe it was the hot, dry summer following the very wet spring and wet back end.  Whatever the reason the dales really do look a picture now and any one contemplating a salmon fishing trip next week should bring a camera.  When the salmon aren't there there will always be plenty to photograph.

I was sorely tempted this week by a property advert for a croft in the far north west of Skye.  6 acres, a trout stream, two building plots, 35 goats, grazing rights on 1000 acres of the Glendale estate, a three bedroomed Victorian house and views to kill for, all for

29 September 2006

    It's a cracking morning here in the valley.  Just a high, light covering of cloud with plenty of diffuse sun and a very light breeze.  The river is still a bit on the low side but conditions are not bad for the final trouting days of the season.

The first fallen leaves are now on the pastures round the house and it really feels like autumn has begun especially as the sloe gin got made yesterday and put down for Christmas.

I can't remember seeing for many years such a crop of berries and fruit on the trees as we have now.  A walk up the river is brightened on even the dullest day by the burning bushes that are the rowans and may trees.  They seem almost overburdened with berries and hawes.  The same is true of my damson tree, enough this year for several bottles of wine.

I'm not sure what the reason is for this super abundance.  Maybe it was the hot, dry summer following the very wet spring and wet back end.  Whatever the reason the dales really do look a picture now and any one contemplating a salmon fishing trip next week should bring a camera.  When the salmon aren't there there will always be plenty to photograph.

I was sorely tempted this week by a property advert for a croft in the far north west of Skye.  6 acres, a trout stream, two building plots, 35 goats, grazing rights on 1000 acres of the Glendale estate, a three bedroomed Victorian house and views to kill for, all for

28 September 2006

    We had a surprisingly wet night with quite a lot of rain driven on by a strong southerly wind.  Consequently the river is up a bit this morning, probably not enough to make a good salmon water but the last couple of days of trout fishing should be good.  This morning is bright with broken cloud and patchy sunshine.  It's warm and the wind has dropped.  All in all, ideal conditions.

Yesterday I posted up a couple of pictures of Phil's  latest work at the Hatchery.  Look in the Hatchery folder.  All the recent rain has started to fill the crayfish pond so it's obvious that, at least, is watertight.

Received wisdom suggests that I should reduce these postings to once a week during the closed season so from Monday I will begin to wind things down a bit and post updates each Sunday from !5 October.  If we get the money to carry out the project at Nanny Carr's then there will be quite a bit to report so postings may be more frequent as work progresses.  Let's wait and see.

I recently had a contact from a trout conservation body in Toronto, Canada who had found us on the web.  This may lead to an interesting opportunity so watch this space.

Ian

27 September 2006

    Another rather grey start to the day with 100% cloud cover.  It's pretty high stuff so no real threat of rain yet.  The wind is negligible so no problems casting on any reach on the river.  It came out bright and sunny for most of yesterday and that seems to be a pattern that's been true of the past few days.  Gloomy start but brighter later.  It gives quite good fishing conditions in the afternoon with a rise at about 2pm.

The spawning channels at the hatchery are now almost complete.  Just the gravel to put in and some tidying up to do.  Then the pipework and buffer dam need to be installed and it's just about done.  I will post up a couple of pictures later.

The cloudiness in the Tarn is certainly of plant origin.  A quick look under the microscope yesterday confirms this, but it's by no means obvious just what the microphyte is.  I suspect that a barley straw treatment this winter will clear it and set things up for much better water conditions next season.  The cause is probably the very hot and dry weather during June and July.  Once the temperature dropped a bit the stuff started to grow exponentially.  It doesn't seem to worry the fish, but analysis of catch data suggests that may be limiting fishing success as the ratio of catch to visit has dropped significantly since the water became cloudy and there are plenty of fish in there.

The Parish Council have decided to hold a public meeting on 5 October at 7pm in the Village Hall to give people a chance to see the plans submitted for the development at Grey Bridge and to voice concerns.  All are very welcome and it would be good to see one or two MAA members there.

Ian

26 September 2006

    It started off quite bright and sunny but in the past half hour cloud has built up driven on by a stiffening and chilly north east breeze.  It looks like a wet morning in prospect which may help to lift the river and bring the salmon up over the Foss.

I had some welcome news from the EA yesterday.  Our fencing work at Nanny Carr's does not need consent as it's agricultural fencing and exempt from the usual controls.  I now wait for a response from the National Park and English Nature but as EN have a memorandum of understanding with the EA which means that if one grants consent or exempts a project then it's deemed that the other consents also I don't foresee any problems.  The real sticking point will be the availability of grant funding which is far less generous now since the Chancellor clawed back

26 September 2006

    It started off quite bright and sunny but in the past half hour cloud has built up driven on by a stiffening and chilly north east breeze.  It looks like a wet morning in prospect which may help to lift the river and bring the salmon up over the Foss.

I had some welcome news from the EA yesterday.  Our fencing work at Nanny Carr's does not need consent as it's agricultural fencing and exempt from the usual controls.  I now wait for a response from the National Park and English Nature but as EN have a memorandum of understanding with the EA which means that if one grants consent or exempts a project then it's deemed that the other consents also I don't foresee any problems.  The real sticking point will be the availability of grant funding which is far less generous now since the Chancellor clawed back